You keep lying to my face and I think it’s true,

The world turns faster as I begin to realize;

In the end I’m alone and you’ve abandoned me too.

 

Your blank eyes remind me of someone I once knew,

Their heart too was completely filled with lies;

You keep lying to my face and I think it’s true.

 

My silent screams create an echo through

My mind, my mind a place I truly despise;

In the end I’m alone and you’ve abandoned me too.

 

This sort of sadness can only be understood by few,

I turn around and the tears shine through my eyes;

You keep lying to my face and I think it’s true.

 

I face the glass and immediately I rue,

You stare back intently, catching me by surprise;

In the end I’m alone and you’ve abandoned me too.

 

Mirror, mirror, “J’accuse” I truly do,

I know what’s coming; the head-shake, the pleas, the sighs,

You keep lying to my face and I think it’s true.

In the end I’m alone and you’ve abandoned me too.

___________________________________________________________________

 

What’s a Villanelle? 

A poem consisting of 19 lines (4 tercets and one quatrain). The villanelle has a rigid rhyme scheme and repetition of the 1st and 3rd lines of the first stanza. The villanelle has no established meter but 19th-century poets tended to use trimeter and tetrameter, while 20th-century authors used pentameter.

The villanelle originates from Jean Passerat’s “Villanelle (J’ay perdu ma Tourterelle)”. Examples of villanelles: “Do not go gentle into that good night” by Dylan Thomas and “ Mad Girl’s Love Song” by Sylvia Plath.

Reflection:

I wrote this villanelle for my Creative Writing class at school and wanted to share. we had to choose a specific type of poem with specific characteristics and reproduce one of our own.

I chose a villanelle because of its flexible meter, as well as the repetition of the lines which ties the theme of the poem together. I read “Do not go gentle into that good night” by Dylan Thomas in my freshman year, which was also when I wrote a villanelle for the first time. I haven’t attempted to write a villanelle since then, until now of course, so I think it was interesting coming back to it. The villanelle I wrote in freshman year was much more rigid meter wise whereas this poem is more loose, and has no exact meter.

“You keep lying to my face and I think it’s true”, initially suggests that the speaker is talking to someone that has lied to them and disappointed them multiple times, later shifting to their own personal struggles. In the end it is revealed the, “you” the speaker is talking to is in fact is self as implied by the phrase, mirror, mirror”. The speaker has become completely detached from the person they see in the mirror. The first line describes a person who feels cheated and lied to, however, in the last stanza the line’s meaning changes to draw attention to the speaker’s inner struggle.